Report back on MERL Tech DC

Day 1, MERL Tech DC 2018. Photo by Christopher Neu.

The MERL Tech Conference explores the intersection of Monitoring, Evaluation, Research and Learning (MERL) and technology. The main goals of “MERL Tech” as an initiative are to:

  • Transform and modernize MERL in an intentionally responsible and inclusive way
  • Promote ethical and appropriate use of tech (for MERL and more broadly)
  • Encourage diversity & inclusion in the sector & its approaches
  • Improve development, tech, data & MERL literacy
  • Build/strengthen community, convene, help people talk to each other
  • Help people find and use evidence & good practices
  • Provide a platform for hard and honest talks about MERL and tech and the wider sector
  • Spot trends and future-scope for the sector

Our fifth MERL Tech DC conference took place on September 6-7, 2018, with a day of pre-workshops on September 5th. Some 300 people from 160 organizations joined us for the 2-days, and another 70 people attended the pre-workshops.

Attendees came from a wide diversity of professions and disciplines:

What professional backgrounds did we see at MERL Tech DC in 2018?

An unofficial estimate on speaker racial and gender diversity is here.

Gender balance on panels

At this year’s conference, we focused on 5 themes (See the full agenda here):

  1. Building bridges, connections, community, and capacity
  2. Sharing experiences, examples, challenges, and good practice
  3. Strengthening the evidence base on MERL Tech and ICT4D approaches
  4. Facing our challenges and shortcomings
  5. Exploring the future of MERL

As always, sessions were related to: technology for MERL, MERL of ICT4D and Digital Development programs, MERL of MERL Tech, digital data for adaptive decisions/management, ethical and responsible data approaches and cross-disciplinary community building.

Big Data and Evaluation Session. Photo by Christopher Neu.

Sessions included plenaries, lightning talks and breakout sessions. You can find a list of sessions here, including any presentations that have been shared by speakers and session leads. (Go to the agenda and click on the session of interest. If we have received a copy of the presentation, there will be a link to it in the session description).

One topic that we explored more in-depth over the two days was the need to get better at measuring ourselves and understanding both the impact of technology on MERL (the MERL of MERL Tech) and the impact of technology overall on development and societies.

As Anahi Ayala Iacucci said in her opening talk — “let’s think less about what technology can do for development, and more about what technology does to development.” As another person put it, “We assume that access to tech is a good thing and immediately helps development outcomes — but do we have evidence of that?”

Feedback from participants

Some 17.5% of participants filled out our post-conference feedback survey, and 70% of them rated their experience either “awesome” or “good”. Another 7% of participants rated individual sessions through the “Sched” app, with an average session satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of 10.

Topics that survey respondents suggested for next time include: more basic tracks and more advanced tracks, more sessions relating to ethics and responsible data and a greater focus on accountability in the sector.  Read the full Feedback Report here!

What’s next? State of the Field Research!

In order to arrive at an updated sense of where the field of technology-enabled MERL is, a small team of us is planning to conduct some research over the next year. At our opening session, we did a little crowdsourcing to gather input and ideas about what the most pressing questions are for the “MERL Tech” sector.

We’ll be keeping you informed here on the blog about this research and welcome any further input or support! We’ll also be sharing more about individual sessions here.

About Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and Kurante in 2013. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization with research and strategy. She is involved in developing responsible data policies for both Catholic Relief Services and USAID. Since 2011, she has been advising The Rockefeller Foundation’s Evaluation Office on the use of ICTs in monitoring and evaluation. Prior to becoming an independent consultant, Linda worked for 16 years with Plan International. Linda runs Technology Salons in New York City and advocates for ethical approaches for using ICTs and digital data in the humanitarian and development space. She is the co-author of several publications on technology and development, including Emerging Opportunities: Monitoring and Evaluation in a Tech-Enabled World with Michael Bamberger. Linda blogs at Wait… What? and tweets as @meowtree. See Linda’s full bio on LInkedIn.

Please Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.