MERL Tech DC Session Ideas are due Monday, Apr 22!

MERL Tech is coming up in September 2019, and there are only a few days left to get your session ideas in for consideration! We’re actively seeking practitioners in monitoring, evaluation, research, learning, data science, technology (and other related areas) to facilitate every session.

Session leads receive priority for the available seats at MERL Tech and a discounted registration fee. Submit your session ideas by midnight ET on April 22, 2019. You will hear back from us by May 20 and, if selected, you will be asked to submit the final session title, summary and outline by June 17.

Submit your session ideas here by April 22, midnight ET

This year’s conference theme is MERL Tech: Taking Stock

Conference strands include:

Tech and traditional MERL:  How is digital technology enabling us to do what we’ve always done, but better (consultation, design, community engagement, data collection and analysis, databases, feedback, knowledge management)? What case studies can be shared to help the wider sector learn and grow? What kinks do we still need to work out? What evidence base exists that can support us to identify good practices? What lessons have we learned? How can we share these lessons and/or skills with the wider community?

Data, data, and more data: How are new forms and sources of data allowing MERL practitioners to enhance their work? How are MERL Practitioners using online platforms, big data, digitized administrative data, artificial intelligence, machine learning, sensors, drones? What does that mean for the ways that we conduct MERL and for who conducts MERL? What concerns are there about how these new forms and sources of data are being used and how can we address them? What evidence shows that these new forms and sources of data are improving MERL (or not improving MERL)? What good practices can inform how we use new forms and sources of data? What skills can be strengthened and shared with the wider MERL community to achieve more with data?

Emerging tools and approaches: What can we do now that we’ve never done before? What new tools and approaches are enabling MERL practitioners to go the extra mile? Is there a use case for blockchain? What about facial recognition and sentiment analysis in MERL? What are the capabilities of these tools and approaches? What early cases or evidence is there to indicate their promise? What ideas are taking shape that should be tried and tested in the sector? What skills can be shared to enable others to explore these tools and approaches? What are the ethical implications of some of these emerging technological capabilities?

The Future of MERL: Where should we be going and what should the future of MERL look like? What does the state of the sector, of digital data, of technology, and of the world in which we live mean for an ideal future for the MERL sector? Where do we need to build stronger bridges for improved MERL? How should we partner and with whom? Where should investments be taking place to enhance MERL practices, skills and capacities? How will we continue to improve local ownership, diversity, inclusion and ethics in technology-enabled MERL? What wider changes need to happen in the sector to enable responsible, effective, inclusive and modern MERL?

Cross-cutting themes include diversity, inclusion, ethics and responsible data, and bridge-building across disciplines. Please consider these in your session proposals and in how you are choosing your speakers and facilitators.

Submit your session ideas now!

MERL Tech is dedicated to creating a safe, inclusive, welcoming and harassment-free experience for everyone. Please review our Code of Conduct. Session submissions are reviewed and selected by our steering committee.

About Linda Raftree

Linda Raftree supports strategy, program design, research, and technology in international development initiatives. She co-founded MERLTech in 2014 and Kurante in 2013. Linda advises Girl Effect on digital safety, security and privacy and supports the organization with research and strategy. She is involved in developing responsible data policies for both Catholic Relief Services and USAID. Since 2011, she has been advising The Rockefeller Foundation’s Evaluation Office on the use of ICTs in monitoring and evaluation. Prior to becoming an independent consultant, Linda worked for 16 years with Plan International. Linda runs Technology Salons in New York City and advocates for ethical approaches for using ICTs and digital data in the humanitarian and development space. She is the co-author of several publications on technology and development, including Emerging Opportunities: Monitoring and Evaluation in a Tech-Enabled World with Michael Bamberger. Linda blogs at Wait… What? and tweets as @meowtree. See Linda’s full bio on LInkedIn.

Please Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.