Tag Archives: DCE

Discrete choice experiment (DCE) to generate weights for a multidimensional index

In his MERL Tech Lightning Talk, Simone Lombardini, Global Impact Evaluation Adviser, Oxfam, discussed his experience with an innovative method for applying tech to help determine appropriate metrics for measuring concepts that escape easy definition. To frame his talk, he referenced Oxfam’s recent experience with using discrete choice experiments (DCE) to establish a strategy for measuring women’s empowerment.

Two methods already exist, Simone points out, for transforming soft concepts into hard metrics. First, the evaluator could assume full authority and responsibility over defining the metrics. Alternatively, the evaluator could design the evaluation so that relevant stakeholders are incorporated into the process and use their input to help define the metrics.

Though both methods are common, they are missing (for practical reasons) the level of mass input that could make them truly accurate reflections of the social perception of whatever concept is being considered. Tech has a role to play in scaling the quantity of input that can be collected. If used correctly, this could lead to better evaluation metrics.

Simone described this approach as “context-specific” and “multi-dimensional.” The process starts by defining the relevant characteristics (such as those found in empowered women) in their social context, then translating these characteristics into indicators, and finally combining indicators into one empowerment index for evaluating the project.

After the characteristics are defined, a discrete choice experiment can be used to determine its “weight” in a particular social context. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) is a technique that’s frequently been used in health economics and marketing, but not much in impact evaluation. To implement a DCE, researchers present different hypothetical scenarios to respondents and ask them to decide which one they consider to best reflect the concept in question (i.e. women’s empowerment). The responses are used to assess the indicators covered by the DCE, and these can then be used to develop an empowerment index.

This process was integrated into data collection process and added 10 mins at the end of a one hour survey, and was made practicable due to the ubiquity of smartphones. The results from Oxfam’s trial run using this method are still being analyzed. For more on this, watch Lombardini’s video below!