Tag Archives: emerging

Geospatial, location and big data: emerging MERL Tech approaches

Our first webinar in the series Emerging Data Landscapes in M&E, on Geospatial, location and big data: Where have we been and where can we go? was held on 28 July. We had a lively discussion on the use of these innovative technologies in the world of evaluation.

First, Estelle Raimondo,  Senior Evaluation Officer at the World Bank Independent Evaluation Group, framed the discussion with her introduction on Evaluation and emerging data: what are we learning from early applications? She noted how COVID-19 has been an accelerator of change, pushing the evaluation community to explore new, innovative technologies to overcome today’s challenges, and set the stage for the ethical, conceptual and methodical considerations we now face.

Next came the Case Study: Integrating geospatial methods into evaluations: opportunities and lessons from Anupam Anand, Evaluation Officer at the Global Environmental Facility, Independent Evaluation Office, and Hur Hassnain, Senior Evaluation Advisor, European Commission DEVCO/ESS. After providing an overview of the advantages of using satellite and remote sensing data, particularly in fragile and conflict zones, the presenters gave the examples of their use in Syria and Sierra Leone.

The second Case Study: Observing from space when you cannot observe from the field, was presented by Joachim Vandercasteelen, Young Professional at World Bank Independent Evaluation Group. This example focused on using geospatial data for evaluating a biodiversity conservation project in Madagascar, as traveling to the field was not feasible. The presentation gave an overview on how to use such technology for both quantitative and qualitative assessments, but also the downsides to consider.

Lastly, Alexandra Robinson, Co-Author of Big Data to Data Science: Moving from What to How in the MERL Tech Space, and Market Strategy and Data Ethics Lead at Threshold.World, discussed What are the organizational barriers to adopting new data types for M&E? This presentation focused on six main barriers to using big data, but also shared some key recommendations to improve its use.

The full recording of the webinar, including the PowerPoint Presentations and Questions & Answers session at the end, are available on the EES’ YouTube page.

Over the next month, we will release specific blogs of each of the presentations, where the speakers will answer the questions participants raised during the webinar that were not already addressed during the Q&A, and provide the links to further reading on the subject. These will be publicly available on the EES Blog.

The EES would like to thank our speakers for this engaging webinar, as well as our partners The Development Café, MERL Tech, and the World Bank IEG.

Stay tuned for our next webinar in the series. You can also follow the EES on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, and sign up to receive our monthly newsletter EuropEval Digest for more exciting updates!

Emerging Technologies: How Can We Use Them for MERL?

Guest post from Kerry Bruce, Clear Outcomes

A new wave of technologies and approaches has the potential to influence how monitoring, evaluation, research and learning (MERL) practitioners do their work. The growth in use of smartphones and the internet, digitization of existing data sets, and collection of digital data make data increasingly available for MERL activities. This changes how MERL is conducted and, in some cases, who conducts it.

We recently completed research on emerging technologies for use in MERL as part of a wider research project on The State of the Field of MERL Tech.

We hypothesized that emerging technology is revolutionizing the types of data that can be collected and accessed and the ways that it can be processed and used for better MERL. However, improved research on and documentation of how these technologies are being used is required so the sector can better understand where, when, why, how, and for which populations and which types of MERL these emerging technologies would be appropriate.

The team reviewed the state of the field and found there were three key new areas of data that MERL practitioners should consider:

  • New kinds of data sources, such as application data, sensor data, data from drones and biometrics. These types of data are providing more access to information and larger volumes of data than ever before.
  • New types of systems for data storage.  The most prominent of these was the distributed ledger technologies (also known as blockchain) and an increasing use of cloud and edge computing.  We discuss the implications of these technologies for MERL.
  • New ways of processing data, mainly from the field of machine learning, specifically supervised and unsupervised learning techniques that could help MERL practitioners manage large volumes of both quantitative and qualitative data.

These new technologies hold great promise for making MERL practices more precise, automated and timely. However, some challenges include:

  • A need to clearly define problems so the choice of data, tool, or technique is appropriate
  • Non-representative selection bias when sampling
  • Reduced MERL practitioner or evaluator control
  • Change management needs to adapt how organizations manage data
  • Rapid platform changes and difficulty with assessing the costs
  • A need for systems thinking which may involve stitching different technologies together

To address emerging challenges and make best use of the new data, tools, and approaches, we found a need for capacity strengthening for MERL practitioners, greater collaboration among social scientists and technologists, a need for increased documentation, and a need for the incorporation of more systems thinking among MERL practitioners.

Finally there remains a need for greater attention to justice, ethics and privacy in emerging technology.

Download the paper here!

Read the other papers in the series here!

New Research! The State of the Field of MERL Tech, 2014-2019

The year 2020 is a compelling time to look back and pull together lessons from five years of convening hundreds of monitoring, evaluation, research, and learning and technology practitioners who have joined us as part of the MERL Tech community. The world is in the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, and there is an urgent need to know what is happening, where, and to what extent. Data is a critical piece of the COVID-19 response — it can mean the difference between life and death. And technology use is growing due to stay-at-home orders and a push for “remote monitoring” and data collection from a distance.

At the same time, we’re witnessing (and I hope, also joining in with) a global call for justice — perhaps a tipping point — in the wake of decades of racist and colonialist systems that operate at the level of nations, institutions, organizations, the global aid and development systems, and the tech sector. There is no denying that these power dynamics and systems have shaped the MERL space as a whole, and the MERL Tech space as well.

Moments of crisis tend to test a field, and we live in extreme times. The coming decade will demand a nimble, adaptive, fair, and just use of data for managing complexity and for gaining longer-term understanding of change and impact. Perhaps most importantly, in 2020 and beyond, we need meaningful involvement of stakeholders at every level and openness to a re-shaping of our sector and its relationships and power dynamics.

It is in this time of upheaval and change that we are releasing a set of four papers that aim to take stock of the field from 2014-2019 as launchpad for shaping the future of MERL Tech. In September 2018, the papers’ authors began reviewing the past five years of MERL Tech events to identify lessons, trends, and issues in this rapidly changing field. They also reviewed the literature base in an effort to determine what we know, what we yet need to understand about technology in MERL, and what are the gaps in the formal literature. No longer is this a nascent field, yet it is one that is hard to keep up with, given that it is fast paced and constantly shifting with the advent of new technologies. We have learned many lessons over the past five years, but complex political, technical, and ethical questions remain.

The State of the Field series includes four papers:

MERL Tech State of the Field: The Evolution of MERL Tech: Linda Raftree, independent consultant and MERL Tech Conference organizer.

 

What We Know About Traditional MERL Tech: Insights from a Scoping Review: Zach Tilton, Michael Harnar, and Michele Behr, University of Western Michigan; Soham Banerji and Manon McGuigan, independent consultants; and Paul Perrin, Gretchen Bruening, John Gordley and Hannah Foster, University of Notre Dame; Linda Raftree, independent consultant and MERL Tech Conference organizer.

Big Data to Data Science: Moving from “What” to “How” in the MERL Tech SpaceKecia Bertermann, Luminate; Alexandra Robinson, Threshold.World; Michael Bamberger, independent consultant; Grace Lyn Higdon, Institute of Development Studies; Linda Raftree, independent consultant and MERL Tech Conference organizer.

Emerging Technologies and Approaches in Monitoring, Evaluation, Research, and Learning for International Development Programs: Kerry Bruce and Joris Vandelanotte, Clear Outcomes; and Valentine Gandhi, The Development CAFE and Social Impact.

Through these papers, we aim to describe the State of the Field up to 2019 and to offer a baseline point in time from which the wider MERL Tech community can take action to make the next phase of MERL Tech development effective, responsible, ethical, just, and equitable. We share these papers as conversation pieces and hope they will generate more discussion in the MERL Tech space about where to go from here.

We’d like to start or collaborate on a second round of research to delve into areas that were under-researched or less developed. Your thoughts are most welcome on topics that need more research, and if you are conducting research about MERL Tech, please get in touch and we’re happy to share here on MERL Tech News or to chat about how we could work together!

EES podcasts and webinar series on emerging technologies

Guest post, Lauren Weiss, European Evaluation Society

As you may be aware, the European Evaluation Society’s biennial conference has been postponed to September 2021, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the meantime, EES is continuing to work for you, and we are excited to announce the launch of two new initiatives.

First, our new podcast series, EvalEdge, is now available! It focuses on the role of evaluation in shaping how new and emerging technologies can be adapted in international development and in larger society. It explores the latest technological developments, from dig data and geospatial analysis, to blockchain and Internet of Things (IoTs).

Our first episode features MERL Tech’s co-founder Linda Raftree, who discusses innovative examples of using big data, the ethical considerations to be aware of, and much more! Check it out here!

Building on this momentum, EES is also launching a webinar series titled “Emerging Data Landscapes in M&E.” In partnership with Dev CAFÉ, MERL Tech, and the World Bank IEG, this series is devoted to discussing the use of innovative technologies in the world of evaluation.

The first event, “Geospatial, location and big data: Where have we been and where can we go? will take place on 28 July, 15:00 CEST (9:00 EST).

This interactive and free webinar will provide concrete examples of using geospatial and location data to improve our M&E practices. It will also discuss the barriers to using such technologies and brainstorm on ways to overcome them, by inviting feedback and questions from the online audience.

It will include speakers from the World Bank IEG, the European Commission’s DEVCO/ESS, and the Global Environment Facility. You can find more information on our website.

To register for this webinar click here.

We look forward to seeing you on 28 July for this exciting discussion!

For now, to learn more about EES’ upcoming activities, visit our website, or sign up for our monthly newsletter by emailing secretariat@europeanevaluation.org. You can also follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.