Tag Archives: London

Reinventing the flat tire… don’t build what is already built!

by Ricardo Santana, MERL Practitioner

One typical factor that delays many projects in international development is the design and creation from scratch of hardware and software to provide a certain feature or accomplish a task. And, while it is true that in some cases a specific design is required, in most cases the outputs can be achieved through solutions already available in the market.

Why is this important? Because we witness over and over again how budgets are wasted in mismanaged projects and programs, delaying solutions, generating skepticism in funders, beneficiaries and other stakeholders and finally delivering a poor result. It is sad to realize that some of these issues may have been avoided simply using solutions and products already available, proved and at reasonable cost.

Then, what do we do? It is hard to find solutions aimed at international development by just browsing through Internet. During MERL Tech London 2018, the NGO Engineering for Change presented their Solutions Library. (Disclaimer: I have contributed to the library by analysing products, software and tools in different application spaces). In this database it is possible to explore and consult many available solutions that may help tackle a specific challenge or need to deliver a good result.

It doesn’t mean that this is the only place on which to rely for everything, or that projects absolutely need to adapt their processes to what is available. But as a professional responsible for evaluating and optimizing projects and programs in government and international development, I know that is always a good place for consulting on different technologies that are designed to help accelerate the overcoming of social inequalities, increasing access to services or automating and simplifying the monitoring, evaluation, research and learning processes.

Through my collaboration with this platform I came to know many different solutions to perform and effectively manage MERL processes. Some of these include: Magpi, Ushaidi, Epicollect5, RapidPro, mWater, SurveyCTO and VOTO Mobile. Some of these are private and some are OpenSource. Some are for managing disaster scenario, others for making poll, for health or for other services. What is impressive is the variety of solutions.

This was a sweet and sour discovery for me. As many other professionals, I wasted important resources and time developing software that was found in robust and previously tested forms that was in many cases a more cost effective and faster solution. However, knowledge is power and now many solutions are on my radar and I have now developed a clear sense of the need to explore before implement.

And that is my humble advice to any who is responsible of deploying a Monitoring, Evaluation, Research and Learning process within their projects. Before we start working like crazy, as we all do, due to our strong commitment to our responsibilities: take some time to carry out proper research on what platforms and software are already available in the market that may suit your needs and evaluate whether there is something feasible or useful or not before re-building every single thing from scratch. That certainly will foster your effectiveness and optimize your delivery cost and time.

As Mariela said in her MERL Tech Lightning Talk: Don’t reinvent the flat tire! You can submit ideas for the Solutions Library or participate as a solutions reviewer too. You can also find more information on the library and how solutions are vetted here at the Library website.

Register now for MERL Tech Jozi, August 1-2 or MERL Tech DC, September 6-7, 2018 if you’d like to join the discussions in person!

Big data or big hype: a MERL Tech debate

by Shawna Hoffman, Specialist, Measurement, Evaluation and Organizational Performance at the Rockefeller Foundation.

Both the volume of data available at our fingertips and the speed with which it can be accessed and processed have increased exponentially over the past decade.  The potential applications of this to support monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of complex development programs has generated great excitement.  But is all the enthusiasm warranted?  Will big data integrate with evaluation — or is this all just hype?

A recent debate that I chaired at MERL Tech London explored these very questions. Alongside two skilled debaters (who also happen to be seasoned evaluators!) – Michael Bamberger and Rick Davies – we sought to unpack whether integration of big data and evaluation is beneficial – or even possible.

Before we began, we used Mentimeter to see where the audience  stood on the topic:

Once the votes were in, we started.

Both Michael and Rick have fairly balanced and pragmatic viewpoints; however, for the sake of a good debate, and to help unearth the nuances and complexity surrounding the topic, they embraced the challenge of representing divergent and polarized perspectives – with Michael arguing in favor of integration, and Rick arguing against.

“Evaluation is in a state of crisis,” Michael argued, “but help is on the way.” Arguments in favor of the integration of big data and evaluation centered on a few key ideas:

  • There are strong use cases for integration. Data science tools and techniques can complement conventional evaluation methodology, providing cheap, quick, complexity-sensitive, longitudinal, and easily analyzable data.
  • Integration is possible. Incentives for cross-collaboration are strong, and barriers to working together are reducing. Traditionally these fields have been siloed, and their relationship has been characterized by a mutual lack of understanding of the other (or even questioning of the other’s motivations or professional rigor).  However, data scientists are increasingly recognizing the benefits of mixed methods, and evaluators are seeing the potential to use big data to increase the number of types of evaluation that can be conducted within real-world budget, time and data constraints. There are some compelling examples (explored in this UN Global Pulse Report) of where integration has been successful.
  • Integration is the right thing to do.  New approaches that leverage the strengths of data science and evaluation are potentially powerful instruments for giving voice to vulnerable groups and promoting participatory development and social justice.   Without big data, evaluation could miss opportunities to reach the most rural and remote people.  Without evaluation (which emphasizes transparency of arguments and evidence), big data algorithms can be opaque “black boxes.”

While this may paint a hopeful picture, Rick cautioned the audience to temper its enthusiasm. He warned of the risk of domination of evaluation by data science discourse, and surfaced some significant practical, technical, and ethical considerations that would make integration challenging.

First, big data are often non-representative, and the algorithms underpinning them are non-transparent. Second, “the mechanistic approaches offered by data science, are antithetical to the very notion of evaluation being about people’s values and necessarily involving their participation and consent,” he argued. It is – and will always be – critical to pay attention to the human element that evaluation brings to bear. Finally, big data are helpful for pattern recognition, but the ability to identify a pattern should not be confused with true explanation or understanding (correlation ≠ causation). Overall, there are many problems that integration would not solve for, and some that it could create or exacerbate.

The debate confirmed that this question is complex, nuanced, and multi-faceted. It helped to remind that there is cause for enthusiasm and optimism, at the same time as a healthy dose of skepticism. What was made very clear is that the future should leverage the respective strengths of these two fields in order to maximize good and minimize potential risks.

In the end, the side in favor of integration of big data and evaluation won the debate by a considerable margin.

The future of integration looks promising, but it’ll be interesting to see how this conversation unfolds as the number of examples of integration continues to grow.

Interested in learning more and exploring this further? Stay tuned for a follow-up post from Michael and Rick. You can also attend MERL Tech DC in September 2018 if you’d like to join in the discussions in person!

Blockchain: the ultimate solution?

by Ricardo Santana, MERL Practitioner

I had the opportunity during MERL Tech London 2018 to attend a very interesting session to discuss blockchains and how can they be applied in the MERL space. This session was led by Valentine Gandhi, Founder of The Development CAFÉ, Zara Rahman, Research and Team Lead at the The Engine Room, and Wayan Vota, Co-founder of Kurante.

The first part of the session was an introduction to blockchain, which is basically an distributed ledger system. Why is it an interesting solution? Because the geographically distributed traces left in multiple devices make for a very robust and secure system. It is not possible to take a unilateral decision to scrap or eliminate data because it would be reflected in the distributed constitution of the data chain. Is it possible to corrupt the system? Well, yes, but what makes it robust and secure is that for that to happen, every single person participating in the blockchain system must agree to do so.

That is the powerful innovation of the technology. It remains somehow to the torrents of technology to share files:  it is very hard to control this when your file storage is not in a single server but rather in an enormous number of end-user terminals.

What I want to share from this session, however, is not how the technology works! That information is readily available on the Internet and other sources.

What I really found interesting was the part of the session where professionals interested in blockchain shared our doubts and the questions that we would need to clarify in order to decide whether blockchain technology would be required or not.

Some of the most interesting shared doubts and concerns around this technology were:

What sources of training and other useful resources are available if you want to implement blockchain?

  • Say the organization or leadership team decides that a blockchain is required for the solution. I am pretty sure it is not hard to find information about blockchain on the Internet, but we all face the same problem — the enormous amount of information available makes it tricky to reach the holy grail that provides just enough information without losing hours to desktop research. It would be incredibly beneficial to have a suggested place where this info can be find, even more if it were a specialized guide aimed at the MERL space.

What are the data space constraints?

  • I found this question very important. It is a key aspect of the design and scalability of the solution. I assume that it will not be an important amount of data but I really don’t know. And maybe it is not a significant amount of information for a desktop or a laptop, but what if we are using cell phones as end terminals too? This need to be addressed so the design is based on facts and not assumptions.

Use cases.

  • Again, there are probably a lot of them to be found all over the Internet, but they are hardly going to be insightful for a specific MERL approach. Is it possible to have a repository of relevant cases for the MERL space?

When is blockchain really required?

  • It would be really helpful to have a simple guide that helps any professional clarify whether the volume or importance of the information is worth the implementation of a Blockchain system or not.

Is there a right to be forgotten in Blockchain?

  • Recent events give a special relevance to this question. Blockchains are very powerful to achieve traceability, but what if I want my information to be eliminated because it is simply my right? This is an important aspect in technologies that have a distributed logic. How to use the powerful advantages of blockchain while allocating the individual rights of every single person to take unilateral decisions on their private or personal information?

I am not an expert in the matter but I do recognize the importance of these questions and the hope is that the people able to address them can pick them up and provide useful answers and guidance to clarify some or all of them.

If you have answers to these questions, or more questions about blockchain and MERL, please add them in the comments!

If you’d like to be a part of discussions like this one, register to attend the next MERL Tech conference! MERL Tech Jozi is happening August 1-2, 2018 and we just opened up registration today! MERL Tech DC is coming up September 6-7. Today’s the last day to submit your session ideas, so hurry up and fill out the form if you have an idea to present or share!

 

 

Takeaways from MERL Tech London

Written by Vera Solutions and originally published here on 16th April 2018.

In March, Zak Kaufman and Aditi Patel attended the second annual MERL Tech London conference to connect with leading thinkers and innovators in the technology for monitoring and evaluation space. In addition to running an Amp Impact demo session, we joined forces with Joanne Trotter of the Aga Khan Foundation as well as Eric Barela and Brian Komar from Salesforce.org to share lessons learned in using Salesforce as a MERL Tech solution. The panel included representatives from Pencils of Promise, the International Youth Foundation, and Economic Change, and was an inspiring showcase of different approaches to and successes with using Salesforce for M&E.

The event packed two days of introspection, demo sessions, debates, and sharing of how technology can drive more efficient program monitoring, stronger evaluation, and a more data-driven social sector. The first day concluded with a (hilarious!) Fail Fest–an open and honest session focused on sharing mistakes in order to learn from them.

At MERL Tech London in 2017, participants identified seven priority areas that the MERL Tech community should focus on:

  1. Responsible data policy and practice
  2. Improving data literacy
  3. Interoperability of data and systems
  4. User-driven, accessible technologies
  5. Participatory MERL/user-centered design
  6. Lean MERL/User-focused MERL
  7. Overcoming “extractive” data approaches

These priorities were revisited this year, and it seemed to us that almost all revolve around a recurrent theme of the two days: focusing on the end user of any MERL technology. The term “end user” was not itself without controversy–after all, most of our MERL tech tools involve more than one kind of user.

When trying to dive into the fourth, fifth, and sixth priorities, we often came back to the issue of who is the proverbial “user” for whom we should be optimizing our technologies. One participant mentioned that regardless of who it is, the key is to maintain a lens of “Do No Harm” when attempting to build user-centered tools.

The discussion around the first and seventh priorities naturally veered into a discussion of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and how we can do better as a sector by using it as a guideline for data protection beyond Europe.

A heated session with Oxfam, Simprints, and the Engine Room dove into the pros, cons, and considerations of biometrics in international development. The overall sense was that biometrics can offer tremendous value to issues like fraud prevention and healthcare, but also enhance the  sector’s challenges and risks around data protection. This is clearly a topicwhere much movement can be expected in the coming years.

In addition to meeting dozens of NGOs, we connected with numerous tech providers working in the space, including SimPrints, SurveyCTO, Dharma, Social Cops, and DevResults. We’re always energized to learn about others’ tools and to explore integration and collaboration opportunities.

We wrapped up the conference at a happy hour event co-hosted by ICT4D London and Salesforce.org, with three speakers focused on ‘ICT as a catalyst for gender equality’. A highlight from the evening was a passionate talk by Seyi Akiwowo, Founder of Glitch UK, a young organization working to reduce online violence against women and girls. Seyi shared her experience as a victim of online violence and how Glitch is turning the tables to fight back.

We’re looking forward for the first MERL Tech Johannesburg taking place August 1-2, 2018.

 

Technologies in monitoring and evaluation | 5 takeaways

Bloggers: Martijn Marijnis and Leonard Zijlstra. This post originally appeared on the ICCO blog on April 3, 2018.
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Technologies in monitoring and evaluation | 5 takeaways

On March 19 and 20 ICCO participated in the MERL Tech 2018 in London. The conference explores the possibilities of technology in monitoring, evaluation, learning and research in development. About 200 like-minded participants from various countries participated. Key issues on the agenda were data privacy, data literacy within and beyond your organization, human-centred monitoring design and user-driven technologies. Interesting practices where shared, amongst others in using blockchain technologies and machine learning. Here are our most important takeaways:

1)  In many NGOs data gathering still takes place in silo’s

Oxfam UK shared some knowledgeable insights and practical tips in putting in place an infrastructure that combines data: start small and test, e.g. by building up a strong country use case; discuss with and learn from others; ensure privacy by design and make sure senior leadership is involved. ICCO Cooperation currently faces a similar challenge, in particular in combining our household data with our global result indicators.

2)  Machine learning has potential for NGOs

While ICCO recently started to test machine learning in the food security field (see this blog) other organisations showcased interesting examples: the Wellcome Trust shared a case where they tried to answer the following question: Is the organization informing and influencing policy and if so, how? Wellcome teamed up their data lab and insight & analysis team and started to use open APIs to pull data in combination with natural language processing to identify relevant cases of research supported by the organization. With their 8.000 publications a year this would be a daunting task for a human team. First, publications linked to Wellcome funding were extracted from a European database (EPMC) in combination with end of grant reports. Then WHO’s reference section was scraped to see if and to what extent WHO’s policy was influenced and to identify potential interesting cases for Wellcome’s policy team.

3)  Use a standardized framework for digital development

See digitalpinciples.org. It gives – amongst others – practical guidelines on how to use open standards and open data, how data can be reused, how privacy and security can be addressed, how users can and should be involved in using technologies in development projects. It is a useful framework for evaluating your design.

4)  Many INGOs get nervous these days about blockchain technology

What is it, a new hype or a real game changer? For many it is just untested technology with high risks and little upside for the developing world. But, for example INGOs working in agriculture value chains or in humanitarian relief operations, its potential is definitely consequential enough to merit a closer look. It starts with the underlying principle, that users of a so-called blockchain can transfer value, or assets, between each other without the need for a trusted intermediary. The running history of the transactions is called the blockchain, and each transaction is called a block. All transactions are recorded in a ledger that is shared by all users of a blockchain.

The upside of blockchain applications is the considerable time and money saving aspect of it. Users rely on this shared ledger to provide a transparent view into the details of the assets or values, including who owns them, as well as descriptive information such as quality or location. Smallholder farmers could benefit (e.g. real-time payment on delivery, access to credit), so can international sourcing companies (e.g. traceability of produce without certification), banks (e.g. cost-reductions, risk-reduction), as much as refugees and landless (e.g. registration, identification). Although we haven’t yet seen large-scale adoption of blockchain technology in the development sector, investors like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and various venture capitalists are paying attention to this space.

But one of the main downsides or challenges for blockchain, like with agricultural technology at large, is connecting the technology to viable business models and compelling use cases. With or without tested technology, this is hard enough as it is and requires innovation, perseverance and focus on real value for the end-user; ICCO’s G4AW projects gain experience with blockchain.

5)  Start thinking about data-use incentives

Over the years, ICCO has made significant investments in monitoring & evaluation and data skills training. Yet limited measurable results of increased data use can be seen, like in many other organizations. US-based development consultant Cooper&Smith shared revealing insights into data usage incentives. It tested three INGOs working across five regions globally. The hypothesis was, that better alignment of data-use training incentives leads to increased data use later on. They looked at both financial and non-financial rewards that motivate individuals to behave in a particular way. Incentives included different training formats (e.g. individual, blended), different hardware (e.g. desktop, laptop, mobile phone), recognition (e.g. certificate, presentation at a conference), forms of feedback & support (e.g. one-on-one, peer group) and leisure time during the training (e.g. 2 hours/week, 12 hours/week). Data use was referred to as the practice of collecting, managing, analyzing and interpreting data for making program policy and management decisions.

They found considerable differences in appreciation of the attributes. For instance, respondents overwhelmingly prefer a certificate in data management, but instead they currently receive primarily no recognition or only recognition from their supervisor. Or  one region prefers a certificate while the other prefers attending an international conference as reward. Or that they prefer one-on-one feedback but instead they receive only peer-2-peer support. The lesson here is, that while most organizations apply a ‘one-size fits all’-reward system (or have no reward system at all), this study points at the need to develop a culturally sensitive and geographically smart reward system to see real increase in data usage.

For many NGOs the data revolution has just begun, but we are underway!

MERL Tech London 2018 Agenda is out!

We’ve been working hard over the past several weeks to finish up the agenda for MERL Tech London 2018, and it’s now ready!

We’ve got workshops, panels, discussions, case studies, lightning talks, demos, community building, socializing, and an evening reception with a Fail Fest!

Topics range from mobile data collection, to organizational capacity, to learning and good practice for information systems, to data science approaches, to qualitative methods using mobile ethnography and video, to biometrics and blockchain, to data ethics and privacy and more.

You can search the agenda to find the topics, themes and tools that are most interesting, identify sessions that are most relevant to your organization’s size and approach, pick the session methodologies that you prefer (some of us like participatory and some of us like listening), and to learn more about the different speakers and facilitators and their work.

Tickets are going fast, so be sure to snap yours up before it’s too late! (Register here!)

View the MERL Tech London schedule & directory.

 

MERL Tech London session ideas due this Friday, Nov 10th!

MERL Tech London is coming up on March 19-20, 2018. Session ideas are due by Friday, November 10th, so be sure to get yours in this week!!

Submission Deadline: Friday, November 10, 2017.

Session leads receive priority for the available seats at MERL Tech and a discounted registration fee. You will hear back from us in early December and, if selected, you will be asked to submit an updated and final session title, summary and outline by January 19th, 2018.

Topics we’re looking for:

  • Case studies: Sharing end-to-end experiences/learning from a MERL Tech process
  • MERL Tech 101: How-to use a MERL Tech tool or approach
  • Methods & Frameworks: Sharing/developing/discussing methods and frameworks for MERL Tech
  • Data: Big, large, small, quant, qual, real-time, online-offline, approaches, quality, etc.
  • Innovations: Brand new, untested technologies or approaches and their application to MERL(Tech)
  • Debates: Lively discussions, big picture conundrums, thorny questions, contentious topics related to MERL Tech
  • Management: People, organizations, partners, capacity strengthening, adaptive management, change processes related to MERL Tech
  • Evaluating MERL Tech: comparisons or learnings about MERL Tech tools/approaches and technology in development processes
  • Failures: What hasn’t worked and why, and what can be learned from this?
  • Demo Tables: to share MERL Tech approaches, tools, and technologies
  • Other topics we may have missed!

To get you thinking — take a look at past agendas from MERL Tech LondonMERL Tech DC and MERL Tech News.

Submit your session idea now!

We’re actively seeking a diverse (in every way) set of MERL Tech practitioners to facilitate every session. We encourage organizations to open this opportunity to colleagues and partners working outside of headquarters and to support their participation. (And please, no all-male panels!)

MERL Tech is dedicated to creating a safe, inclusive, welcoming and harassment-free experience for everyone. Please review our Code of Conduct. Session submissions are reviewed by our steering committee.

Submit your session ideas by November 10th!

If you have any questions about your submission idea, please contact Linda Raftree.

(Registration is also open!)

Submit your session ideas for MERL Tech London by Nov 10th!

MERL Tech London

Please submit a session idea, register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech London, on March 19-20, 2018, for in-depth sharing and exploration of what’s happening across the multidisciplinary monitoring, evaluation, research and learning field.

Building on MERL Tech London 2017, we will engage 200 practitioners from across the development and technology ecosystems for a two-day conference seeking to turn the theories of MERL technology into effective practice that delivers real insight and learning in our sector.

MERL Tech London 2018

Digital data and new media and information technologies are changing MERL practices. The past five years have seen technology-enabled MERL growing by leaps and bounds, including:

  • Adaptive management and ‘developmental evaluation’
  • Faster, higher quality data collection.
  • Remote data gathering through sensors and self-reporting by mobile.
  • Big Data and social media analytics
  • Story-triggered methodologies

Alongside these new initiatives, we are seeing increasing documentation and assessment of technology-enabled MERL initiatives. Good practice guidelines and new frameworks are emerging and agency-level efforts are making new initiatives easier to start, build on and improve.

The swarm of ethical questions related to these new methods and approaches has spurred greater attention to areas such as responsible data practice and the development of policies, guidelines and minimum ethical frameworks and standards for digital data.

Please submit a session idea, register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech London to discuss all this and more! You’ll have the chance to meet, learn from, debate with 150-200 of your MERL Tech peers and to see live demos of new tools and approaches to MERL.

Submit Your Session Ideas Now!

Like previous conferences, MERL Tech London will be a highly participatory, community-driven event and we’re actively seeking practitioners in monitoring, evaluation, research, learning, data science and technology to facilitate every session.

Please submit your session ideas now. We are particularly interested in:

  • Case studies: Sharing end-to-end experiences/learning from a MERL Tech process
  • MERL Tech 101: How-to use a MERL Tech tool or approach
  • Methods & Frameworks: Sharing/developing/discussing methods and frameworks for MERL Tech
  • Data: Big, large, small, quant, qual, real-time, online-offline, approaches, quality, etc.
  • Innovations: Brand new, untested technologies or approaches and their application to MERL(Tech)
  • Debates: Lively discussions, big picture conundrums, thorny questions, contentious topics related to MERL Tech
  • Management: People, organizations, partners, capacity strengthening, adaptive management, change processes related to MERL Tech
  • Evaluating MERL Tech: comparisons or learnings about MERL Tech tools/approaches and technology in development processes
  • Failures: What hasn’t worked and why, and what can be learned from this?
  • Demo Tables: to share MERL Tech approaches, tools, and technologies
  • Other topics we may have missed!

Session Submission Deadline: Friday, November 10, 2017.

Session leads receive priority for the available seats at MERL Tech and a discounted registration fee. You will hear back from us in early December and, if selected, you will be asked to submit an updated and final session title, summary and outline by Friday, January 19th, 2018.

Register Now!

Please register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech London 2018 to examine these trends with an exciting mix of educational keynotes, lightning talks, and group breakouts, including an evening Fail Festival reception to foster needed networking across sectors.

We are charging a modest fee to better allocate seats and we expect to sell out quickly again this year, so buy your tickets or demo tables now. Event proceeds will be used to cover event costs and to offer travel stipends for select participants implementing MERL Tech activities in developing countries.

Technology in MERL: an approximate history

by Linda Raftree, MERL Tech co-organizer.

At MERL Tech London, Maliha Khan led us in an exercise to map out our shared history of MERL Tech. Following that we did some prioritizing around potential next steps for the sector (which I’ll cover in a next post).

She had us each write down 1) When we first got involved in something related to MERL Tech, and 2) What would we identify as a defining moment or key event in the wider field or in terms of our own experiences with MERL Tech.

The results were a crowdsourced MERL Tech Timeline on the wall.

 

An approximate history of tech in MERL 

We discussed the general flow of how technology had come to merge with MERL in humanitarian and development work over the past 20 years. The purpose was not to debate about exact dates, but to get a sense of how the field and community had emerged and how participants had experienced its ebbs and flows over time.

Some highlights:

  • 1996 digital photos being used in community-led research
  • 1998 mobile phones start to creep more and more into our work
  • 2000 the rise of SMS
  • 2001 spread of mobile phone use among development/aid workers, especially when disasters hit
  • 2003 Mobile Money comes onto the scene
  • 2004 enter smart phones; Asian tsunami happens and illustrates need for greater collaboration
  • 2005 increased focus on smartphones; enter Google maps
  • 2008 IATI, Hans Rosling interactive data talk/data visualization
  • 2009 ODK, FrontlineSMS, more and more Mobile Money and smart phones, open data; global ICT4D conference
  • 2010 Haiti earthquakes – health, GIS and infrastructure data collected at large scale, SMS reporting and mapping
  • 2011 FrontlineSMS’ data integrity guide
  • 2012 introduction and spread of cloud services in our work; more and more mapping/GIS in humanitarian and development work
  • 2013 more focus and funding from donors for tech-enabled work, more awareness and work on data standards and protocols, more use of tablets for data collection, bitcoin and blockchain enter the humanitarian/development scene; big data
  • 2014 landscape report on use of ICTs for M&E; MERL Tech conference starts to come together; Responsible Data Forum; U-Report and feedback loops; thinking about SDGs and Data revolution
  • 2015 Ebola crisis leads to different approach to data, big data concerns and ‘big data disasters’, awareness of the need for much improved coordination on tech and digital data; World Bank Digital Dividends report; Oxfam Responsible Data policy
  • 2016 real-time data and feedback loops are better unpacked and starting to be more integrated, adaptive management focus, greater awareness of need of interoperability, concerns about digital data privacy and security
  • 2017 MERL Tech London and the coming-together of the related community

What do you think? What’s missing? We’d love to have a more complete and accurate timeline at some point….