Tag Archives: MERL Tech DC

MERL on the Money: Are we getting funding for data right?

By Paige Kirby, Senior Policy Advisor at Development Gateway

Time for a MERL pop quiz: Out of US $142.6 billion spent in ODA each year, how much goes to M&E?

A)  $14.1-17.3 billion
B)  $8.6-10 billion
C)  $2.9-4.3 billion

It turns out, the correct answer is C. An average of only $2.9-$4.3 billion — or just 2-3% of all ODA spending — goes towards M&E.

That’s all we get. And despite the growing breadth of logframes and depths of donor reporting requirements, our MERL budgets are likely not going to suddenly scale up.

So, how can we use our drop in the bucket better, to get more results for the same amount of money?

At Development Gateway, we’ve been doing some thinking and applied research on this topic, and have three key recommendations for making the most of MERL funding.

Teamwork

Image Credit: Kjetil Korslien CC BY NC 2.0

When seeking information for a project baseline, midline, endline, or anything in between, it has become second nature to budget for collecting (or commissioning) primary data ourselves.

Really, it would be more cost-and time-effective for all involved if we got better at asking peers in the space for already-existing reports or datasets. This is also an area where our donors – particularly those with large country portfolios – could help with introductions and matchmaking.

Consider the Public Option

Image Credit: Development Gateway

And speaking of donors as a second point – why are we implementers responsible for collecting MERL relevant data in the first place?

If partner governments and donors invested in country statistical and administrative data systems, we implementers would not have such incentive or need to conduct one-off data collection.

For example, one DFID Country Office we worked with noted that a lack of solid population and demographic data limited their ability to monitor all DFID country programming. As a result, DFID decided to co-fund the country’s first census in 30 years – which benefited DFID and non-DFID programs.

The term “country systems” can sound a bit esoteric, pretty OECD-like – but it really can be a cost-effective public good, if properly resourced by governments (or donor agencies), and made available.

Flip the Paradigm

Image Credit: Rafael J M Souza CC BY 2.0

And finally, a third way to get more bang for our buck is – ready or not – Results Based Financing, or RBF. RBF is coming (and, for folks in health, it’s probably arrived). In an RBF program, payment is made only when pre-determined results have been achieved and verified.

But another way to think about RBF is as an extreme paradigm shift of putting M&E first in program design. RBF may be the shake-up we need, in order to move from monitoring what already happened, to monitoring events in real-time. And in some cases – based on evidence from World Bank and other programming – RBF can also incentivize data sharing and investment in country systems.

Ultimately, the goal of MERL should be using data to improve decisions today. Through better sharing, systems thinking, and (maybe) a paradigm shake-up, we stand to gain a lot more mileage with our 3%.

 

Present or lead a session at MERL Tech DC!

Please sign up to present, register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech DC 2018 on September 6-7, 2018 at FHI 360 in Washington, DC.

We will engage 300 practitioners from across the development ecosystem for a two-day conference seeking to turn the theories of MERL technology into effective practice that delivers real insight and learning in our sector.

MERL Tech DC 2018, September 6-7, 2018

Digital data and new media and information technologies are changing monitoring, evaluation, research and learning (MERL). The past five years have seen technology-enabled MERL growing by leaps and bounds. We’re also seeing greater awareness and concern for digital data privacy and security coming into our work.

The field is in constant flux with emerging methods, tools and approaches, such as:

  • Adaptive management and developmental evaluation
  • Faster, higher quality data collection
  • Remote data gathering through sensors and self-reporting by mobile
  • Big data, data science, and social media analytics
  • Story-triggered methodologies

Alongside these new initiatives, we are seeing increasing documentation and assessment of technology-enabled MERL initiatives. Good practice guidelines are emerging and agency-level efforts are making new initiatives easier to start, build on and improve.

The swarm of ethical questions related to these new methods and approaches has spurred greater attention to areas such as responsible data practice and the development of policies, guidelines and minimum ethical standards for digital data.

Championing the above is a growing and diversifying community of MERL practitioners, assembling from a variety of fields; hailing from a range of starting points; espousing different core frameworks and methodological approaches; and representing innovative field implementers, independent evaluators, and those at HQ that drive and promote institutional policy and practice.

Please sign up to present, register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech DC to experience 2 days of in-depth sharing and exploration of what’s been happening across this cross-disciplinary field, what we’ve been learning, complex barriers that still need resolving, and debate around the possibilities and the challenges that our field needs to address as we move ahead.

Submit Your Session Ideas Now

Like previous conferences, MERL Tech DC will be a highly participatory, community-driven event and we’re actively seeking practitioners in monitoring, evaluation, research, learning, data science and technology to facilitate every session.

Please submit your session ideas now. We are looking for a range of topics, including:

  • Experiences and learning at the intersection of MERL and tech
  • Ethics, inclusion, safeguarding, and data privacy
  • Data (big data, data science, data analysis)
  • Evaluation of ICT-enabled efforts
  • The future of MERL
  • Tech-enabled MERL Failures

Visit the session submission page for more detail on each of these areas.

Submission Deadline: Monday, April 30, 2018 (at midnight EST)

Session leads receive priority for the available seats at MERL Tech and a discounted registration fee. You will hear back from us in early June and, if selected, you will be asked to submit the final session title, summary and outline by June 30.

Register Now

Please sign up to present or register to attend MERL Tech DC 2018 to examine these trends with an exciting mix of educational keynotes, lightning talks, and group breakouts, including an evening reception and Fail Fest to foster needed networking across sectors and an exploration of how we can learn from our mistakes.

We are charging a modest fee to better allocate seats and we expect to sell out quickly again this year, so buy your tickets or demo tables now. Event proceeds will be used to cover event costs and to offer travel stipends for select participants implementing MERL Tech activities in developing countries.

You can also submit session ideas for MERL Tech Jozi, coming up on August 1-2, 2018! Those are due on March 31st, 2018!

MERL Tech DC Conference wrap up

Over 300 MERL Tech practitioners came together in Washington DC the first week of September for MERL Tech DC.

Kathy Newcomer, American Evaluation Association President, gives her opening talk on Day 2.
Kathy Newcomer, American Evaluation Association President, gives her opening talk on Day 2.
Blockchain was one of the most popular sessions.
Blockchain was one of the most popular sessions.

Core topic areas included organizational change and capacity; evaluation of MERL Tech and ICT4D; big data, small data and data analytics; tech tools to support qualitative methods; new and emerging technologies with a potential role in MERL; inclusion and ways tech can support ‘downward’ accountability; practical sessions on tools and methods; and community building in the MERL Tech sector.

Check out InSTEDD’s fantastic recap of the event in pictures and Tweets.

What does “MERL Tech Maturity” look like?

In plenary, groups worked together to discuss “MERL Tech Maturity Models” – in other words, what are the characteristics of an organization that is fully mature when it comes to MERL Tech. People also spent some time thinking about where their organizations fit on the “MERL Tech Maturity” scale: from brand new or less experienced to fully mature. (We’ll share more about this in a future post).

The Data Turnpike was voted the best depiction of a Maturity Model.
The Data Turnpike was voted the best depiction of a Maturity Model.

As always, there was plenty of socializing with old and new friends and collaborators too!

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Stay tuned for session summaries and more, coming up over the next several weeks here on MERL Tech News!

MERL Tech DC: Session ideas due by May 12th!

Don’t forget to sign up to present, register to attend, or reserve a demo table for MERL Tech DC on September 7-8, 2017 at FHI 360 in Washington, DC.

Submit Your Session Ideas by Friday, May 12th!

Like previous conferences, MERL Tech DC will be a highly participatory, community-driven event and we’re actively seeking practitioners in monitoring, evaluation, research, learning, data science and technology to facilitate every session.

Please submit your session ideas now. We are particularly interested in:

  • Discussions around good practice and evidence-based review
  • Workshops with practical, hands-on exercises
  • Discussion and sharing on how to address methodological aspects such as rigor, bias, and construct validity in MERL Tech approaches
  • Future-focused thought provoking ideas and examples
  • Conversations about ethics, inclusion and responsible policy and practice in MERL Tech

Session leads receive priority for the available seats at MERL Tech and a discounted registration fee. You will hear back from us in early June and, if selected, you will be asked to submit the final session title, summary and outline by June 30.

If you have questions or are unsure about a submission idea, please get in touch with Linda Raftree.

Submit your ideas here!