Tag Archives: MERL Tech London

DataDay TV: MERL Tech Edition

What data superpower would you ask for? How would you describe data to your grandparents? What’s the worst use of data you’ve come across? 

These are a few of the questions that TechChange’s DataDay TV Show tackles in its latest episode.

The DataDay Team (Nick Martin, Samhir Vasdev, and Priyanka Pathak) traveled to MERL Tech DC last September to ask attendees some tough data-related questions. They came away with insightful, unusual, and occasionally funny answers….

If you’re a fan of discussing data, technology and MERL, join us at MERL Tech London on March 19th and 20th. 

Tickets are going fast, so be sure to register soon if you’d like to attend!

If you want to take your learning to the next level with a full-blown course, TechChange has a great 2018 schedule, including topics like blockchain, AI, digital health, data visualization, e-learning, and more. Check out their course catalog here.

What about you, what data superpower would you ask for?

 

Self-service data collection with the most vulnerable

This is a summary of a Lightning Talk presented by Salla Mankinen, Good Return, at MERL Tech London in 2017. 

When collecting data from the most vulnerable target groups, organizations often use methods such as guesstimating, interviewing done by enumerators, SMS, or IVR. The organization Good Return created a smart phone and tablet app that allowed vulnerable groups to interact directly with the data collection tool, without training or previous exposure to any technology.

At MERL Tech London in February 2017, Salla Mankinen shared Good Return’s experiences with using tablets for self-service check in at village training centers in Cambodia.

“Our challenge was whether we could have app-based, self-service data collection for the most vulnerable and in the most remote locations,” she said. “And could there be a journey from technology illiteracy to technology confidence” in the process?

The team created a voice and image based application that worked even for those who had little technology knowledge. It collected data from village participants such as “Why did you miss the last training session?” or “Do you have any money left this week?”

By the end of the exercise, 72% of participants felt confident with the app and 83% said they felt a lot more confident with technology in general.

Watch Salla’s presentation here or take a look at her slides here!

Register now for MERL Tech London, March 19-20, 2018!

Thoughts from MERL Tech UK

merltech_uk-2016Post by Christopher Robert, Dobility (Survey CTO)

MERL Tech UK was held in London this week. It was a small, intimate gathering by conference standards (just under 100 attendees), but jam-packed full of passion, accumulated wisdom, and practical knowledge. It’s clear that technology is playing an increasingly useful role in helping us with monitoring, evaluation, accountability, research, and learning – but it’s also clear that there’s plenty of room for improvement. As a technology provider, I walked away with both more inspiration and more clarity for the road ahead.

Some highlights:

  • I’ve often felt that conferences in the ICT4D space have been overly-focused on what’s sexy, shiny, and new over what’s more boring, practical, and able to both scale and sustain. This conference was markedly different: it exceeded even the tradition of prior MERL Tech conferences in shifting from the pathology of “pilotitus” to a more hard-nosed focus on what really works.
  • There was more talk of data responsibility, which I took as another welcome sign of maturation in the space. This idea encompasses much beyond data security and the honoring of confidentiality assurances that we at Dobility/SurveyCTO have long championed, and it amounted to a rare delight: rather than us trying to push greater ethical consideration on others, for once we felt that our peers were pushing us to raise the bar even further. My own ideas in terms of data responsibility were challenged, and I came to realize that data security is just one piece of a larger ethical puzzle.
  • There are far fewer programs and projects re-inventing the wheel in terms of technology, which is yet another welcome sign of maturation. This is helping more resources to flow into the improvement and professionalization of a small but diverse set of technology platforms. Too much donor money still seems to be spent on technologies that have effective, well-established, and sustainable options available, but it’s getting better.
  • However, it’s clear that there are still plenty of ways to re-invent the wheel, and plenty of opportunities for greater collaboration and learning in the space. Most organizations are having to go it alone in terms of procuring and managing devices, training and supporting field teams, designing and monitoring data-collection activities, organizing and managing collected data, and more. Some larger international organizations who adopted digital technologies early have built up some impressive institutional capacity – but every organization still has its gaps and challenges, later adopters don’t have that historical capacity from which to draw, and smaller organizations don’t have the same kind of centralized institutional capacity.
  • Fortunately, MERL Tech organizers and participants like Oxfam GB and World Bank DIME have not only built tremendous internal capacity, but also been extremely generous in thinking through how to share that capacity with others. They share via their blogs and participation in conferences like this, and they are always thinking about new and more effective ways to share. That’s both heartening and inspiring.

I loved the smaller, more intimate nature of MERL Tech UK, but I have quickly come to somewhat regret that it wasn’t substantially larger. My first London day post-MERL-Tech was spent visiting with some other SurveyCTO users, including a wonderfully-well-attended talk on data quality at the Zoological Society of London, a meeting with some members of Imperial College London’s Schistosomiasis Control Initiative, and a discussion about some new University of Cambridge efforts to improve data and research on rare diseases in the UK. Later today, I’ll meet with some members of the TUMIKIA project team at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and in retrospect I now wish that all of these others had been at MERL Tech. I’m trying to share lessons as best I can, but it’s obvious that so many other organizations could both contribute to and profit from the kinds of conversations and sharing that were happening at MERL Tech.

Personally, I’ve always been distrustful of product user conferences as narrow, ego-driven, sales-and-marketing kinds of affairs, but I’m suddenly seeing how a SurveyCTO user conference could make real (social) sense. Our users are doing such incredible things, learning so much in the process, building up so much capacity – and so many of them are also willing to share generously with others. The key is providing mechanisms for that sharing to happen. At Dobility, we’ve just kept our heads down and stayed focused on providing and supporting affordable, accessible technology, but now I’m seeing that we could play a greater role in facilitating greater progress in the space. With thousands of SurveyCTO projects now in over 130 countries, the amount of learning – and the potential social benefits to sharing more – is enormous. We’ll have to think about how we can get better and better about helping. And please comment here if you have ideas for us!

Thanks again to Oxfam GB, Comic Relief, and everybody else who made MERL Tech UK possible. It was a wonderful event.