Tag Archives: social network analysis

Visualizing Your Network for Adaptive Program Decision Making

By Alexis Banks, Jennifer Himmelstein, and Rachel Dickinson

Social network analysis (SNA) is a powerful tool for understanding the systems of organizations and institutions in which your development work is embedded. It can be used to create interventions that are responsive to local needs and to measure systems change over time. But, what does SNA really look like in practice? In what ways could it be used to improve your work? Those are the questions we tackled in our recent MERL Tech session, Visualizing Your Network for Adaptive Program Decision Making. ACDI/VOCA and Root Change teamed up to introduce SNA, highlight examples from our work, and share some basic questions to help you get started with this approach.

MERL Tech 2019 participants working together to apply SNA to a program.

SNA is the process of mapping and measuring relationships and information flows between people, groups, organizations, and more. Using key SNA metrics enables us to answer important questions about the systems where we work. Common SNA metrics include (learn more here):

  • Reachability, which helps us determine if one actor, perhaps a local NGO, can access another actor, such as a local government;
  • Distance, which is used to determine how many steps, or relationships, there are separating two actors;
  • Degree centrality, which is used to understand the role that a single actor, such as an international NGO, plays in a system by looking at the number of connections with that organization;
  • Betweenness, which enables us to identify brokers or “bridges” within networks by identifying actors that lie on the shortest path between others; and
  • Change Over Time, which allows us to see how organizations and relationships within a system have evolved.
Using betweenness to address bottlenecks.

SNA in the Program Cycle

SNA can be used throughout the design, implementation, and evaluation phases of the program cycle.

Design: Teams at Root Change and ACDI/VOCA use SNA in the design phase of a program to identify initial partners and develop an early understanding of a system–how organizations do or do not work together, what barriers are preventing collaboration, and what strategies can be used to strengthen the system.

As part of the USAID Local Works program, Root Change worked with the USAID mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) to launch a participatory network map that identified over 1,000 organizations working in community development in BiH, many of which had been previously unknown to the mission. It also provided the foundation for a dialogue with system actors about the challenges facing BiH civil society.

To inform project design, ACDI/VOCA’s Feed the Future Tanzania NAFAKA II Activity, funded by USAID conducted a network analysis to understand the networks associated with village based agricultural advisors (VBAAs)–what services they were offering to farmers already, which had the most linkages to rural actors, which actors were service as bottlenecks, and more. This helped the project identify which VBBA’s to work with through small grants and technical assistance (e.g. key actors), and what additional linkages needed to be built between VBAAs and other types of actors.

NAFAKA II Tanzania

Implementation: We also use SNA throughout program implementation to monitor system growth, increase collaboration, and inform learning and program design adaptation. ACDI/VOCA’s USAID/Honduras Transforming Market Systems Activity uses network analysis as a tool to track business relationships created through primary partners. For example, one such primary partner is the Honduran chamber of tourism who facilitates business relationships through group training workshops and other types of technical assistance. They can then follow up on these new relationships to gather data on indirect outcomes (e.g. jobs created, sales and more).

Root Change used SNA throughout implementation of the USAID funded Strengthening Advocacy and Civic Engagement (SACE) program in Nigeria. Over five years, more than 1,300 organizations and 2,000 relationships across 17 advocacy issue areas were identified and tracked. Nigerian organizations came together every six months to update the map and use it to form meaningful partnerships, coordinate advocacy strategies, and hold the government accountable.

SACE participants explore a hand drawn network map.

Evaluating Impact: Finally, our organizations use SNA to measure results at the mid-term or end of project implementation. In Kenya, Root Change developed the capacity of Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) staff to carry out a baseline, and later an end-of-project network analysis of the relationships between youth and organizations providing employment, education, and entrepreneurship support. The latter analysis enabled AKF to evaluate growth in the network and the extent to which gaps identified in the baseline had been addressed.

AKF’s Youth Opportunities Map in Kenya

The Feed The Future Ghana Agricultural Development and Value Chain Enhancement II (ADVACNE II) Project, implemented by ACDI/VOCA and funded by USAID, leveraged existing database data to demonstrate the outgrower business networks that were established as a result of the project. This was an important way of demonstrating one of ADVANCE II’s major outcomes–creating a network of private service providers that serve as resources for inputs, financing, and training, as well as hubs for aggregating crops for sales.

Approaches to SNA
There are a plethora of tools to help you incorporate SNA in your work. These range from bespoke software custom built for each organization, to free, open source applications.

Root Change uses Pando, a web-based, participatory tool that uses relationship surveys to generate real-time network maps that use basic SNA metrics. ACDI/VOCA, on the other hand, uses unique identifiers for individuals and organizations in its routine monitoring and evaluation processes to track relational information for these actors (e.g. cascaded trainings, financing given, farmers’ sales to a buyer, etc.) and an in-house SNA tool.

Applying SNA to Your Work
What do you think? We hope we’ve piqued your interest! Using the examples above, take some time to consider ways that SNA could be embedded into your work at the design, implementation, or evaluation stage of your work using this worksheet. If you get stuck, feel free to reach out (Alexis Banks, abanks@rootchange.org; Rachel Dickinson, rdickinson@rootchange.org; Jennifer Himmelstein, JHimmelstein@acdivoca.org)!

Visualizing what connects us: Social Network Analysis (SNA) in M&E

by Anne Laesecke (IREX) and Danielle de García (Social Impact). This post also appears on the Social Impact blog and  the IREX blog.

SNA, or Social Network Analysis, continues to gain momentum in the M&E space. This year at MERL Tech, we held an SNA 101 session, giving a quick-and-dirty overview of what it is, how it can contribute to M&E, and useful tips and tools for conducting an SNA. If you missed it, here’s what you need to know:

What is SNA?

SNA is a way to analyze social systems through relationships. Analyzing and visualizing networks can reveal critical insights for understanding relationships between organizations, supply chains; social movements; and/or between individuals. It’s a very versatile tool which can be used throughout the program cycle to measure things like trust and social capital, information flows, resources, collaboration, and disease spread, among other things.

SNA uses a different vocabulary than other types of analyses. For example, the relationships we measure are called ties or links, and the entities that make up a network are called nodes or actors. These can be organizations, people, or even whole networks themselves. We can study nodes more closely by looking at their attributes – things that characterize them (like demographic information), and we can learn more about how nodes interact and cluster by studying communities or modalities within networks. Various measures of the roles nodes play in a network, as well as measures that characterize the networks themselves, can reveal a lot about the systems and hidden relationships at play. For example, we can determine who has the most ties with other actors; who is relatively cut off from the network, or who is connected to the most well-connected actors.

Why would you use SNA for M&E?

The term “social network analysis” often triggers associations with social media, but SNA uses data from a variety of platforms (including but not limited to social media!). For instance, SNA can identify key influencers in systems – important for programs that rely on thinking politically. SNA can also be a useful tool in processing big data with applications for cybersecurity as well as creating biological and epidemiological projections. Beyond looking at networks of individuals, SNA can explore relationships with concepts through analysis of qualitative data and concept mapping. It can also look at organizational risks and processes (think about comparing an organizational chart with who people actually go to within an organization for information).

How do you do SNA?

Conducting SNA mostly follows the same procedure as other analysis.

  1. Determine your purpose and questions. What decisions do you need to make based on the data you get? Who is your audience and what do they need to know? Answering these questions can help you decided what you are trying to measure and how.
  2. Collect your data. SNA can incorporate lots of different data forms, including customized surveys and interviews asking actors in your network about the links they have, external data such as census information or other public records to further inform attributes or triangulate your custom data; and mapping of key locations or concepts. One thing to consider while conducting an SNA – data cleaning is usually a heavier lift than for other types of analysis.
  3. Crunch those numbers. SNA uses matrices to calculate various measures – from types of centrality to network density and beyond. Lucky for us, there are plenty of tools that take on both the analysis and visualization portions of SNA. However, another consideration as you analyze your data is that network data is often not generalizable in the same way as some statistical analysis. If you miss a key node in the network, you may miss an entire portion that is only linked through that node.
  4. Visualize the network. Network visualizations are one of the most distinctive features of SNA and can be incredibly useful as tools to engage partners about your findings. There is a wealth of analysis and visualization tools that can help you do this. We created a worksheet that outlines several, but a few of the most popular are UCINet, Gephi, and NodeXL.
  5. Interpret your results. You now have a beautiful graph that shows what nodes are important in your network. So what? How does it relate to your program? Your interpretation should answer the questions around the purpose of your analysis, but beyond interpretation can serve to improve your programming. Often, SNA results can help make projections for program sustainability based on who key players are and who can continue championing work, or projecting where trends seem to be going and anticipating activities around those areas.

Conclusions and resources

We barely scratched the surface of what SNA can do and there are so many more applications! Some great resources to learn more are the SNA TIG of the American Evaluation Association, Stephen Borgatti’s course website on SNA, and a site of his dedicated completely to designing surveys for SNA.