Tag Archives: analysis

Chain Reaction: How Does Blockchain Fit, if at All, into Assessments of Value for Money of Education Projects?

by Cathy Richards

In this panel, “Chain Reaction: How does blockchain fit, if at all, into assessments of value for money of education projects,” hosted by Christine Harris-Van Keuren of Salt Analytics, panelists gave examples of how they’ve used blockchain to store activity and outcomes data and to track the flow of finances. Valentine Gandhi from The Development Café served as the discussant.

Value for money analysis (or benefit-cost analysis, cost-economy, cost-effectiveness, cost-efficiency, or cost-feasibility) is defined as an evaluation of the best use of scarce resources to achieve a desired outcome. In this panel, participants examined the value for money of blockchain by taking on an aspect of an adapted value-for-money framework. The framework takes into account resources, activities, outputs, and outcomes. Panel members were specifically asked to explain what they gained and lost by using blockchain as well as whether they had to use blockchain at all.

Ben Joakim is the founder and CEO of Disberse, a new financial institution built on distributed ledger technology. Disberse aims to ensure greater privacy and security for the aid sector — which serves some of the most vulnerable communities in the world. Joakim notes that in the aid sector, traditional banks are often slow and expensive, which can be detrimental during a humanitarian crisis. In addition, traditional banks can lack transparency, which increases the potential for the mismanagement and misappropriation of funds. Disberse works to tackle those problems by creating a financial institution that is not only efficient but also transparent and decentralised, thus allowing for greater impact with available resources. Additionally, Disberse allows for multi-currency accounts, foreign currency exchanges, instant fund transfers, end-to-end traceability, donation capabilities, regulatory compliance, and cash transfer systems. Since inception, Disberse has delivered pilots in several countries including Swaziland, Rwanda, Ukraine, and Australia.

David Mikhail of UNCDF discussed the organization’s usage of blockchain technologies in the Nepal remittance corridor. In 2017 alone, Nepal received $6.9 billion in remittances. These funds are responsible for 28.4% of the country’s GDP. One of the main challenges for Nepali migrant families is a lack of financial inclusion characterized by credit interest rates as high as 30%, lack of a documented credit history, and lack of sufficient collateral. Secondarily, families have a difficult time building capital once they migrate. Between the high costs of migration, high-interest rate loans, non-stimulative spending that impacts their ability to save and invest, and lack of credit history make it difficult for migrants to break free of the poverty cycle. Due to this, the organization asked itself whether it could create a new credit product tied to remittances to provide capital and fuel domestic economic development. In theory, this solution would drive financial inclusion by channeling remittances through the formal sector. The product would not only leverage blockchain in order to create a documented credit history, but it would also direct the flow of remittances into short and long-term savings or credit products that would help migrants generate income and assets. 

Tara Vassefi presented on her experience at Truepic, a photo and video verification platform that aims to foster a healthy civil society by pushing back against disinformation. They do this by bolstering the value of authentic photos through the use of verified pixel data from the time of capture and through the independent verification of time and location metadata. Hashed references to time, date, location and exact pixelation are stored on the blockchain. The benefits of using this technology are that the data is immutable and it adds a layer of privacy and security to media. The downsides include marginal costs and the general availability of other technologies. Truepic has been used for monitoring and evaluation purposes in Syria, Jordan, Uganda, China, and Latin America to remotely monitor government activities and provide increased oversight at a lower cost. They’ve found that this human-centric approach, which embeds technology into existing systems, can close the trust gap currently found in society.

Using Social Network Analysis and Feedback to Measure Systems Change

by Alexis Smart, Senior Technical Officer, and Alexis Banks, Technical Officer, at Root Change

As part of their session at MERL Tech DC 2018, Root Change launched Pando, an online platform that makes it possible to visualize, learn from, and engage with the systems where you work. Pando harnesses the power of network maps and feedback surveys to help organizations strengthen systems and improve their impact.

Decades of experience in the field of international development has taught our team that trust and relationships are at the heart of social change. Our research shows that achieving and sustaining development outcomes depends on the contributions of multiple actors embedded in thick webs of social relationships and interactions. However, traditional MERL approaches have failed to help us understand the complex dynamics within those relationships. Pando was created to enable organizations to measure trust, relationships, and accountability between development actors.

Relationship Management & Network Maps

Grounded in social network analysis, Pando uses web-based relationship surveys to identify diverse organizations within a system and track relationships in real time. The platform automatically-generates a network map that visualizes the organizations and relationships within asystem. Data filters and analysis tools help uncover key actors, areas ofcollaboration, and network structures and dynamics.

Feedback Surveys & Analysis

Pando is integrated with Keystone Accountability’s Feedback Commons, an online tool that gives map administrators the ability to collect and analyze feedback about levels of trust and relationship quality among map participants. The combined power of network maps and feedback surveys helps create a holistic understanding of the system of organizations that impact a social issue, facilitate dialogue, and track change over time as actors work together to strengthen the system.

Examples of Systems Analysis

During Root Change’s session, “Measuring Complexity: A Real-Time Systems Analysis Tool,”Root Change Co-Founder, Evan Bloom and Senior Technical Officer, Alexis Smart, highlighted four examples of using network analysis to create social change from our work:

  • Evaluating Local Humanitarian ResponseSystems: We worked with the Harvard Humanitarian Institute (HHI) to evaluate the effect of local capacity development efforts on local ownership within humanitarian response networks in the Philippines, Kenya, Myanmar, and Ethiopia. Using social network analysis, Root Change and HHI assessed the roles of local and international organizations within each network to determine thedegree to which each system was locally-led.
  • Supporting Collective Impact in Nigeria: Network mapping has also been used in the USAID funded Strengthening Advocacy and Civic Engagement (SACE) project in Nigeria. Over five years, more than 1,300 organizationsand 2,000 relationships across 17 advocacy issue areas were identified andtracked. Nigerian organizations used the map to form meaningful partnerships,set common agendas, coordinate strategies, and hold the government accountable.
  • Informing Project Design in Kenya – Root Change and the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) collected relationship data from hundreds of youth and organizations supporting youth opportunities in coastal Kenya. Analysis revealed gaps in expertise within the system, and opportunities to improve relationships among organizations and youth. These insights helped inform AKF’s program design, and ongoing mapping will be used to monitor system change. 
  • Tracking Local Ownership: This year, under USAID Local Works, Root Change is working with USAID missions to measure local ownership of development initiatives using newly designed localization metrics on Pando. USAID Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) launched a national Local Works map, identifying over 1,000 organizations working together on community development. Root Change and USAID BiH are exploring a pilot to use this map to continue to collect data and track localization metrics and train a local organization to support with this process.
     

Join the MERL Tech DC Network Map

As part of the MERL Tech DC 2018 conference, Root Change launched a map of the MERL Tech community. Event participants were invited to join this collaborative mapping effort to identify and visualize the relationships between organizations working to design, fund, and implement technology that supports monitoring, evaluation, research, and learning (MERL) efforts in development.

It’s not too late to join! Email info@mypando.org for an invitation to join the MERL Tech DC map and a chance to explore Pando.

Learn more about Pando

Pando is the culmination of more than a decade of experience providing training and coaching on the use of social network analysis and feedback surveys to design, monitor, and evaluate systems change initiatives. Initial feedback from international and local NGOs, governments, community-based organizations, and more is promising. But don’t take our word for it. We want to hear from you about ways that Pando could be useful in your social impact work. Contact us to discuss ways Pando could be applied in your programs.