Tag Archives: practice

Creating and Measuring Impact in Digital Social and Behavior Change Communication 

By Jana Melpolder

People are accessing the Internet, smartphones, and social media like never before, and the social and behavior change communication community is exploring the use of digital tools and social media for influencing behavior. The MERL Tech session, “Engaging for responsible change in a connected world: Good practices for measuring SBCC impact” was put together by Linda Raftree, Khwezi Magwaza, and Yvonne MacPherson, and it set out to help dive into Digital Social and Behavior Change Communication (SBCC).

Linda is the MERL Tech Organizer, but she also works as an independent consultant. She has worked as an Advisor for Girl Effect on research and digital safeguarding in digital behavior change programs with adolescent girls. She also recently wrote a landscaping paper for iMedia on Digital SBCC. Linda opened the session by sharing lessons from the paper, complemented by learning drawn from research and practice at Girl Effect.

Linda shares good practices from a recent landscape report on digital SBCC.

Digital SBCC is expanding due to smartphone access. In the work with Girl Effect, it was clear that even when girls in lower income communities did not own smartphones they often borrowed them. Project leaders should consider several relevant theories on influencing human behavior, such as social cognitive theory, behavioral economics, and social norm theory. Additionally, an ethical issue in SBCC projects is whether there is transparency about the behavior change efforts an organization is carrying out, and whether people even want their behaviors to be challenged or changed.

When it comes to creating a SBCC project, Linda shared a few tips: 

  • Users are largely unaware of data risks when sharing personal information online
  • We need to understand peoples’ habits. Being in tune with local context is important, as is design for habits, preferences, and interests.
  • Avoid being fooled by vanity metrics. For example, even if something had a lot of clicks, how do you know an action was taken afterwards? 
  • Data can be sensitive to deal with. For some, just looking at information online, such as facts on contraception, can put them at risk. Be sure to be careful of this when developing content.

The session’s second presenter was Khwezi Magwaza who has worked as a writer and radio, digital, and television producer. She worked as a content editor for Praekelt.org and also served as the Content Lead at Girl Effect. Khwezi is currently providing advisory to an International Rescue Committee platform in Tanzania that aims to support improved gender integration in refugee settings. Lessons from Khwezi from working in digital SBCC included:

  • Sex education can be taboo, and community healthcare workers are often people’s first touch point. 
  • There is a difference between social behavior change and, more precisely, individual behavior change. 
  • People and organizations working in SBCC need to think outside the box and learn how to measure it in non-traditional ways. 
  • Just because something is free doesn’t mean people will like it. We need to aim for high quality, modern, engaging content when creating SBCC programs.
  • It’s also critical to hire the right staff. Khwezi suggested building up engineering capacity in house rather than relying entirely on external developers. Having a digital company hand something over to you that you’re stuck with is like inheriting a dinosaur. Organizations need to have a real working relationship with their tech supplier and to make sure the tech can grow and adapt as the program does.
Panelists discuss digital SBCC with participants.

The third panelist from the session was Yvonne MacPherson, the U.S. Director of BBC Media Action, which is the BBC’s international NGO that was made to use communication and media to further development. Yvonne noted that:

  • Donors often want an app, but it’s important to push back on solely digital platforms. 
  • Face-to-face contact and personal connections are vital in programs, and social media should not be the only form of communication within SBCC programs.
  • There is a need to look at social media outreach experiences from various sectors to learn, but that the contexts that INGOs and national NGOs are working in is different from the environments where most people with digital engagement skills have worked, so we need more research and it’s critical to understand local context and behaviors of the populations we want to engage.
  • Challenges are being seen with so-called “dark channels,” (WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger) where many people are moving and where it becomes difficult to track behaviors. Ethical issues with dark channels have also emerged, as there are rich content options on them, but researchers have yet to figure out how to obtain consent to use these channels for research without interrupting the dynamic within channels.

I asked Yvonne if, in her experience and research, she thought Instagram or Facebook influencers (like celebrities) influenced young girls more than local community members could. She said there’s really no one answer for that one. There actually needs to be a detailed ethnographic research or study to understand the local context before making any decisions on design of an SBCC campaign. It’s critical to understand the target group — what ages they are, where do they come from, and other similar questions.

Resources for the Reader

To learn more about digital SBCC check out these resources, or get in touch with each of the speakers on Twitter:

Data Security and Privacy – MERL Tech presentation spurs action

By Stacey Berlow of Project Balance. The original was posted on Project Balance’s blog.

I had the opportunity to attend MERL Tech (September 7-8, 2017 Washington, DC). I was struck by the number of very thoughtful and content driven sessions. Coming from an IT/technology perspective, it was so refreshing to hear about the intersection of technology and humanitarian programs and how technology can provide the tools and data to positively impact decision making.
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One of the sessions, “Big data, big problems, big solutions: Incorporating responsible data principles in institutional data management” was particularly poignant. The session was presented by Paul Perrin from University of Notre Dame, Alvaro Cobo & Jeff Lundberg from Catholic Relief Services and Gillian Kerr from LogicalOutcomes. The overall theme of the presentation was that in the field of evaluation and ICT4D, we must be thoughtful, diligent and take responsibility for protecting people’s personal and patient data; the potential risk for having a data breach is very high.

PaulPerrinDataRisk

Paul started the session by highlighting the fact that data breaches which expose our personal data, credit card information and health information have become a common occurrence. He brought the conversation back to monitoring and evaluation and research and the gray area between the two, leading to confusion about data privacy. Paul’s argument is that evaluation data is used for research later in a project without proper approval of those receiving services. The risk for misuse and incorrect data handling increases significantly.

Alvaro and Jeff talked about a CRS data warehousing project and how they have made data security and data privacy a key focus. The team looked at the data lifecycle – repository design, data collection, storage, utilization, sharing and retention/destruction – and they are applying best data security practices throughout. And finally, Gillian described the very concerning situation that at NGOs, M&E practitioners may not be aware of data security and privacy best practices or don’t have the funds to correctly meet minimum security standards and leave this critical data aspect behind as “too complicated to deal with.”

The presentation team advocates for the following:

  • Deeper commitment to informed consent
  • Reasoned use of identifiers
  • Need to know vs. nice to know
  • Data security and privacy protocols
  • Data use agreements and protocols for outside parties
  • Revisit NGO primary and secondary data IRB requirements

This message resonated with me in a surprising way. Project Balance specializes in developing data collection applications, data warehousing and data visualization. When we embark on a project we are careful to make sure that sensitive data is handled securely and that client/patient data is de-identified appropriately. We make sure that client data can only be viewed by those that should have access; that tables or fields within tables that hold identifying information are encrypted. Encryption is used for internet data transmission and depending on the application the entire database may be encrypted. And in some cases the data capture form that holds a client’s personal and identifying information may require that the user of the system re-log in.

After hearing the presentation I realized Project Balance could do better. As part of our regular software requirements management process, we will now create a separate and specialized data security and privacy plan document, which will enhance our current process. By making this a defined requirements gathering step, the importance of data security and privacy will be highlighted and will help our customers address any gaps that are identified before the system is built.

Many thanks to the session presenters for bringing this topic to the fore and for inspiring me to improve our engagement process!

Tools, tips and templates for making Responsible Data a reality

by David Leege, CRS; Emily Tomkys, Oxfam GB; Nina Getachew, mSTAR/FHI 360; and Linda Raftree, Independent Consultant/MERL Tech; who led the session “Tools, tips and templates for making responsible data a reality.

The data lifecycle.
The data lifecycle.

For this year’s MERL Tech DC, we teamed up to do a session on Responsible Data. Based on feedback from last year, we knew that people wanted less discussion on why ethics, privacy and security are important, and more concrete tools, tips and templates. Though it’s difficult to offer specific do’s and don’ts, since each situation and context needs individualized analysis, we were able to share a lot of the resources that we know are out there.

To kick off the session, we quickly explained what we meant by Responsible Data. Then we handed out some cards from Oxfam’s Responsible Data game and asked people to discuss their thoughts in pairs. Some of the statements that came up for discussion included:

  • Being responsible means we can’t openly share data – we have to protect it
  • We shouldn’t tell people they can withdraw consent for us to use their data when in reality we have no way of doing what they ask
  • Biometrics are a good way of verifying who people are and reducing fraud

Following the card game we asked people to gather around 4 tables with a die and a print out of the data lifecycle where each phase corresponded to a number (Planning = 1, collecting = 2, storage = 3, and so on…). Each rolled the die and, based on their number, told a “data story” of an experience, concern or data failure related to that phase of the lifecycle. Then the group discussed the stories.

For our last activity, each of us took a specific pack of tools, templates and tips and rotated around the 4 tables to share experiences and discuss practical ways to move towards stronger responsible data practices.

Responsible data values and principles

David shared Catholic Relief Services’ process of developing a responsible data policy, which they started in 2017 by identifying core values and principles and how they relate to responsible data. This was based on national and international standards such as the Humanitarian Charter including the Humanitarian Protection Principles and the Core and Minimum Standards as outlined in Sphere Handbook Protection Principle 1; the Protection of Human Subjects, known as the “Common Rule” as laid out in the Department of Health and Human Services Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects; and the Digital Principles, particularly Principle 8 which mandates that organizations address privacy and security.

As a Catholic organization, CRS follows the principles of Catholic social teaching, which directly relate to responsible data in the following ways:

  • Sacredness and dignity of the human person – we will respect and protect an individual’s personal data as an extension of their human dignity;
  • Rights and responsibilities – we will balance the right to be counted and heard with the right to privacy and security;
  • Social nature of humanity – we will weigh the benefits and risks of using digital tools, platforms and data;
  • Common good – we will open data for the common good only after minimizing the risks;
  • Subsidiarity – we will prioritize local ownership and control of data for planning and decision-making;
  • Solidarity – we will work to educate inform and engage our constituents in responsible data approaches;
  • Option for the poor – we will take a preferential option for protecting and securing the data of the poor; and
  • Stewardship – we will responsibly steward the data that is provided to us by our constituents.

David shared a draft version of CRS’ responsible data values and principles.

Responsible data policy, practices and evaluation of their roll-out

Oxfam released its Responsible Program Data Policy in 2015. Since then, they have carried out six pilots to explore how to implement the policy in a variety of countries and contexts. Emily shared information on these these pilots and the results of research carried out by the Engine Room called Responsible Data at Oxfam: Translating Oxfam’s Responsible Data Policy into practice, two years on. The report concluded that the staff that have engaged with Oxfam’s Responsible Data Policy find it both practically relevant and important. One of the recommendations of this research showed that Oxfam needed to increase uptake amongst staff and provide an introductory guide to the area of responsible data.  

In response, Oxfam created the Responsible Data Management pack, (available in English, Spanish, French and Arabic), which included the game that was played in today’s session along with other tools and templates. The card game introduces some of the key themes and tensions inherent in making responsible data decisions. The examples on the cards are derived from real experiences at Oxfam and elsewhere, and they aim to generate discussion and debate. Oxfam’s training pack also includes other tools, such as advice on taking photos, a data planning template, a poster of the data lifecycle and general information on how to use the training pack. Emily’s session also encouraged discussion with participants about governance and accountability issues like who in the organisation manages responsible data and how to make responsible data decisions when each context may require a different action.

Emily shared the following resources:

A packed house for the responsible data session.
A packed house for the responsible data session.

Responsible data case studies

Nina shared early results of four case studies mSTAR is conducting together with Sonjara for USAID. The case studies are testing a draft set of responsible data guidelines, determining whether they are adequate for ‘on the ground’ situations and if projects find them relevant, useful and usable. The guidelines were designed collaboratively, based on a thorough review and synthesis of responsible data practices and policies of USAID and other international development and humanitarian organizations. To conduct the case studies, Sonjara, Nina and other researchers visited four programs which are collecting large amounts of potentially sensitive data in Nigeria, Kenya and Uganda. The researchers interviewed a broad range of stakeholders and looked at how the programs use, store, and manage personally identifiable data (PII). Based on the research findings, adjustments are being made to the guidelines. It is anticipated that they will be published in October.

Nina also talked about CALP/ELAN’s data sharing tipsheets, which include a draft data-sharing agreement that organizations can adapt to their own contracting contracting documents. She circulated a handout which identifies the core elements of the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) that are important to consider when using PII data.  

Responsible data literature review and guidelines

Linda mentioned that a literature review of responsible data policy and practice has been done as part of the above mentioned mSTAR project (which she also worked on). The literature review will provide additional resources and analysis, including an overview of the core elements that should be included in organizational data guidelines, an overview of USAID policy and regulations, emerging legal frameworks such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and good practice on how to develop guidelines in ways that enhance uptake and use. The hope is that both the Responsible Data Literature Review and the of Responsible Data Guidelines will be suitable for adopting and adapting by other organizations. The guidelines will offer a set of critical questions and orientation, but that ethical and responsible data practices will always be context specific and cannot be a “check-box” exercise given the complexity of all the elements that combine in each situation. 

Linda also shared some tools, guidelines and templates that have been developed in the past few years, such as Girl Effect’s Digital Safeguarding Guidelines, the Future of Privacy Forum’s Risk-Benefits-Harms framework, and the World Food Program’s guidance on Conducting Mobile Surveys Responsibly.

More tools, tips and templates

Check out this responsible data resource list, which includes additional tools, tips and templates. It was developed for MERL Tech London in February 2017 and we continue to add to it as new documents and resources come out. After a few years of advocating for ‘responsible data’ at MERL Tech to less-than-crowded sessions, we were really excited to have a packed room and high levels of interest this year!